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Class: Reimagining Tableware as a Sculptural Landscape


Reimagining Tableware as a Sculptural Landscape

Changing attitudes and emerging social behaviors in food preparation and the social and cultural rituals of eating have lead to changes in the way tableware is made and used. In this short course we will explore historical and contemporary forms of table ware design. Through lectures, class discussion, research and making through drawing, modeling and prototyping in clay we will consider new categories of tableware and new roles for familiar as well as sculptural pieces. If you’re wondering what are the most appropriate forms and designs to use in your work, you’ll gain a better understanding of what’s current and gain an appreciation of the challenges and opportunities makers confront in their creative practice.

Tuesdays July 07 through August 25, 2020. 11:00 AM-1:00 PM EST
Level:  Intermediate / Advanced
Space is limited

Register online at Greenwich House Pottery

In this workshop I will focus on paper templates, slab, coil, and pinched forms used to make everything from plates and bowls to mugs and handles. We will discuss shapes as well as approaches to design, ranging from the practical and ergonomic to the poetic, and playful. 

For this workshop, you will need a computer with Zoom. Students are welcome to act upon the project prompts and try the techniques with me as we progress from week to week. I have found its best to use the class time on zoom to sit back and take notes. The sessions will be recorded and sent to students for future reference. I’m excited to invite you into my studio to share craft strategies and answer questions about the process of making. I will send an email with a Zoom link with details to registered students before the Tuesday workshops. 

This series of workshops requires a few tools. This list of suggested tools is not required for the workshop but may help when you try it on your own. 

  • Clay
  • Banding wheel
  • Scoring tool (a fork will do) 
  • Sharp knife 
  • Metal or rubber rib 
  • Small container for water 
  • Paintbrush 
  • Rolling Pin 
  • A bat or board 
  • Paper for templates (Tarpaper also known as “roofing felt” can be found at any hardware home center. Typical grades are 15 lb. and 30 lb. weight, which indicates the thickness. I like to use the sturdier 30 lb. grade for making templates for large forms.)
  • Utility Knife and/or Scissors
  • Cutting Surface (you can use a board or a self-healing cutting matt) 
  • Pencils 
  • Tape 
  • Sketchbook

Studio Visit in Quarantine

New York Artists Equity invites you to join us on a tour around multimedia artist Andrew Cornell Robinson's studio. Throughout this tour, Robinson discusses the inspirations behind his ceramics, sculptures, and prints while also sharing anecdotes about the potent disruptive power of images.

Robinson’s artwork examines and highlights the historical, collective, and often cyclical nature of the visual language of revolution and unrest. His multidisciplinary work is currently showcased in an online-only exhibition, “Andrew Cornell Robinson: The Time of Protest and Plague,” now featured on our WING project space and Artsy profile. View work from the exhibition on Artsy


Studio in the Time of Protest and Plague.
June 10, 2020 Interview with Andrew Cornell Robinson
By Michael Gormley

Living in a city driven by artistic ambition, “What are you working on” is the go-to question meant to quickly distill the daring of one’s aspirational reach, the aesthetic value of its form and the intent and likelihood of financial success and lasting fame. In the upheaval of social unrest and pandemic, the question sizes up how one is to staying alive. Over the past three months Equity has been posting text, images and videos of pandemic projects its member artists have been engaged in.

Read the full interview with Andrew Cornell Robinson