Viewing all essays in #work on paper

Exhibition: Rapture, A Queer Taste for Color, Texture and Decorative Pattern

A group show of works by eight artists presenting an ensemble of unabashedly delicate and highly decorative works that employ non-traditional craft materials and techniques to arrive at an expression of exquisite beauty that pleasures the eye and quivers the soul.

Opening Reception: Thursday April 29th: 6-8pm

On View: April 29th - May 22nd, 2021, Wednesday to Saturday, 12 - 6pm

Equity Gallery 245 Broome Street, New York, NY 10002

 

Eight gay and queer-identifying artists present an ensemble of unabashedly delicate and highly decorative works that employ non-traditional craft materials and techniques to arrive at an expression of exquisite beauty that pleasures the eye and quivers the soul. For the vast majority of our planet’s inhabitants, life in the immediate aftermath of the COVID pandemic presents an anxious premonitory landscape inciting a narrow range of fear laden and negative responses. An alternative point of view, borrowed from individuals and groups that have weathered similar perilous episodes, allows that the very nature of turbulence propels instances of revelatory phenomena with near equivalent power. Susceptibility to these epiphanic forces seems linked to an individual’s or group’s aptitude to tolerate and remain attentive to the charged dynamics swirling about them while remaining essentially intact---a “wholeness” achieved through a hyper-awareness of what constitutes the core self in relationship to the self’s aptitude for creative manufacturing --the products, affectations, and transformations that allow for adaptive survival and more importantly, unexpected flights of the spirit. For an individual, or a select group, the sum total of these adaptive expressions becomes a language onto itself---an insider argot secreting an inner strength and solidarity that confirms well-being as an achievable aspiration that shores up the individual and safeguards the group. Exuberance, by extension, becomes the best defense. The LGTBQ community, coming under the broad heading of “gay” or “queer”, well exemplifies a group having assembled a richly layered cultural expression---one that often trumpets an exaggerated theatricality of joy and ecstasy to scaffold a sheltering hope against hostile forces. The exhibition “Rapture” stages a full-on display of the avenging transcendence of gaiety as a proven tactic for disarming oppression. The show features the work of seven artists that span two generations and collectively identify as gay, queer and non-binary. Chris Tanner weaponizes triviality and decorative embellishment by deploying non-traditional materials often associated with crafting, such as embroidery, sewing notions, beads, baubles and glittery sequins, to produce intricate sculptural forms that aim to pleasure the eye with an escapist holiday replete with dazzling displays of color, form and texture. Tanner’s installation will focus on his latest driftwood transformations that are fairytale spectacles of bejeweled splendor . Andrew Cornell Robinson, a multimedia artist known to infuse his composite works with design, craft and fine art elements, will display ceramic vessels from his “My Cup Runneth Over” series. Created using traditional raku methods, a firing process initially invented for pottery intended for tea ceremonies (raku translates to “pleasure”), the pieces display dense black surfaces glazed over with shimmering jewel tones further heightened by embellishments of gold, glitter, paint and collaged paper. Peter Hristoff ’s paintings and Sean O’Conner paper constructions similarly blur the line between art and design and mimic patterns one might see in wallpapers, printed fabrics, and quilts. Both employ a collage-inspired technique; for Hristoff , we see all-encompassing, edge-to-edge compositions cast with shadowy silhouettes that activate surface effects and hint at homo-romantic intentions. O’Connor’s naïve cut-outs similarly re-contextualize silhouettes, in this instance borrowing from Grecian urns and classical motifs to arrive at surrealist figure compositions that recall the ephemeral delicacy of Jean Cocteau. Cocteau’s sighing sensual line resurfaces in Harrison Tenzer’s high-chroma graphics that speak in layered hieroglyphs about biomorphic encounters that range from the pornographic to the miraculous. Like Tenser’s drawings, Adrian Milton’s paintings and Wade Schaming’s sculptures, explore the language of abstraction to arrive at a queer aesthetic. Milton, a true child of the sixties, creates psychedelic geometries that recall the glittering flamboyance of his gender-bending drag performances as a Cockette. A magpie, Schaming hordes a wild and colorful assortment of mass- produced detritus and stockpiles it into teetering towers -- a perhaps too obvious symbol of fickle male desire and the paradox of the queer gaze which conflates prey and predator. For further information kindly contact info@nyartistsequity.org

Exhibition: Conjurings & Concoctions

An exhibition of works by Ben Pritchard, Andrew Cornell Robinson, Stephanie Hargrave
November 14 - December 13, 2020
at M. David & Company 56 Bogart Street, Suite 114, Brooklyn NY
We look forward to your visit. The gallery is open on Saturdays & Sundays 1:00pm – 6:00pm by appointment, you may email stephanie@mdavidandco.com to make an appointment.
Opening Reception Saturday 14 November, 5-8pm
Please note, six people at a time in the gallery. Please wear a mask.
My Cup Runneth Over VIIRaku, smoke fired glazed earthenware, with plastic and enamel, 3.75 x 5 x 5 inches
My Cup Runneth Over IVGlazed and raku fired ceramic with enamel, plastic, glitter, and gold leaf
My Cup Runneth Over IIIGlazed and raku fired ceramic with enamel, plastic and glitter
Flower PowerGlazed slipcast and sprig applique porcelain with ink stained body

Conjurings & Concoctions

Exhibition Essay by Paul D’Agostino

An interest in the expressive potential of processes and ideas pertaining to admixtures and amalgamations, in materials and concept alike, coheres the creative practices of Stephanie Hargrave, Andrew Cornell Robinson and Ben Pritchard. This is true in a general sense, as they have all been working in such modes for many years. It’s particularly true, however, with regard to their studio production this year, selections from which constitute the materially rich and mystically spirited works that find convergence in Conjurings & Concoctions. Thick strata of scumbles, spills, brushstrokes, scrapes, drips, smears and scrawls factor into Ben Pritchard’s generously textured oil paintings. These facets of somewhat evasive or unstable facture find ultimate confluence, however, in bold forms that seem to both draw from and manifest ex nihilo entire systems of divinatory symbols, celestial mappings, indecipherable runes. Pritchard’s surfaces might elude, in other words, but his representations assert. Consequently, a small work like Power seems to convey landscape and figure alike as the latter rises through the former, or as the former settles atop the latter — or perhaps the artist’s robustly made marks depict the form of a temple seeking alignment with the stars above. In Debate, background and foreground remain shifty and uncertain in the work’s otherwise formally declarative black and white registers. And in Darkness, a slow-moving circuit of bright yellow marks provides an elegantly brushy, curiously nestling framework for a punchy red orb. Variable saturations and surface treatments yield pared down yet similar results in Pritchard’s works on paper. Andrew Cornell Robinson works consistently in more media and in a broader range of processes than many artists might work in a lifetime. He’s as comfortable shaping clay on a potter’s wheel as he is filling walls with delicate drawings, binding prints and texts into books, making paintings and sculptures for installations, and devising video and photo shoots for narrative-driven exhibitions. Several of these aspects of his work are on display in Conjurings & Concoctions. Ultimately monotypes, the artist’s works on paper in the show, operating in primary-colored concert with one another, evidence a more layered process upon closer scrutiny, revealing themselves to be monotypes executed atop serialized prints of texts and small drawings extracted from an archive of sketches and notes. Quite materially different are Robinson’s ceramics in a series he calls My Cup Runneth Over, in which an almost alchemical admixture of colorful glazes, stains, glitters and gold overlays encourage these ostensibly empty cups to fully spill their guts. Exquisitely beguiling in form and material alike, Robinson’s Memento Mori sculptures present as exuberant apparitions, iconic conjurings of mysterious deities whispering forth from tree hollows in enchanted forests. An enchanted forest, perhaps, is just the place where Stephanie Hargrave’s sculptural amalgamations would find themselves right at home. In her works presented in Conjurings & Concoctions, Hargrave combines stoneware, encaustic, metal and other media to create objects and ephemeral images that are vaguely familiar as forms of known things, but that ultimately resist recognition as specific things or known forms. They are organic; they are inorganic. They are human-hewn, perhaps utilitarian masses; they are the settled matters of nature’s timeless exhalations, growths and primordial gases. Hybrid 25, for instance, is a petrified bubbling puckering out into the open to exhale, or it’s the vacated dwelling of an ancient mollusk. Flashik might be a rattle-like musical instrument for a mysterious rite, or it might be a battle-worn weapon of warfare. It might also be some undying organism whose length of tooth has left it biding its time with arduous, slowly gnashing bites. An especially peculiar object even in the midst of so much strangeness is Hargrave’s Bucaro. Executed in clay and encaustic, it appears as a crimson-saturated, drippily drenched, cardial tissue-like issue pumping lifebloods into and all over itself, and maybe also into its kindred others all around it. As you poke about in the imagined realm of Conjurings & Concoctions, it might be wise to watch your step and mistrust your eyes — while listening closely to the trees and peering up, here and there, at the skies. M. David & Co.

Studio Visit in Quarantine

New York Artists Equity invites you to join us on a tour around multimedia artist Andrew Cornell Robinson's studio. Throughout this tour, Robinson discusses the inspirations behind his ceramics, sculptures, and prints while also sharing anecdotes about the potent disruptive power of images.

Robinson’s artwork examines and highlights the historical, collective, and often cyclical nature of the visual language of revolution and unrest. His multidisciplinary work is currently showcased in an online-only exhibition, “Andrew Cornell Robinson: The Time of Protest and Plague,” now featured on our WING project space and Artsy profile. View work from the exhibition on Artsy


Studio in the Time of Protest and Plague.
June 10, 2020 Interview with Andrew Cornell Robinson
By Michael Gormley

Andrew in the studioBehind Andrew is a pin up wall in his studio that holds over one thousand drawings culled from 30 years of sketchbooks.

Living in a city driven by artistic ambition, “What are you working on” is the go-to question meant to quickly distill the daring of one’s aspirational reach, the aesthetic value of its form and the intent and likelihood of financial success and lasting fame. In the upheaval of social unrest and pandemic, the question sizes up how one is to staying alive. Over the past three months Equity has been posting text, images and videos of pandemic projects its member artists have been engaged in.

Read the full interview with Andrew Cornell Robinson

Drawing Phrygian Caps

At the onset of the corona plague in NYC, I found myself having a recurring dream that prominently featured Phrygian caps, the red liberty caps worn by radicals during the French revolution. A symbol which has its roots in ancient times when it was worn to signify a formerly enslaved person's freedom.

In any case the image and dream seemed significant so I began to draw a series of Phrygian caps with gouache, pastel and ink on hand made paper.

Exhibition: Hard-Line at Equity Gallery

Hard-Line

Andrew Cornell Robinson and Matt Rota, curated by Michael Gormley

March 21st - April 13th, 2019
Opening Reception: Thursday, March 21st, 6 PM-8 PM

Equity Gallery 245 Broome Street, New York, NY 10002
Gallery Hours: Wednesday - Friday, 1-7 PM and Saturday, 12-6 PM

Equity Gallery is pleased to present Hard-Line, a two person exhibition curated by Michael Gormley featuring the artwork of Andrew Cornell Robinson and Matt Rota. By its very nature, the line is considered to be a building block of art-making. It is used as the first step in planning a creative endeavor, the structural scaffolding upon which the artist further builds. However, Robinson and Rota look past this view, realizing the full potential of the line, and allowing it to play a predominant role within their artwork. These two distinctly different artists share a creative implementation of graphic line-work. In their works, lines become an effective and powerful tool for a complex yet straightforward, efficient visual communication and narrative. They utilize the naturally sturdy and rigorous nature of the line, making it a driving force within their art. Through these graphic techniques, their artworks possess a blunt, unwavering immediacy, managing to impart hard-hitting topically relevant subject matters while still retaining an emotionally resonant candor.

The prints and drawings of Robinson are inspired by a visit to Talking Sculptures of Rome, also known as The Congregation of Wits, specific ancient sculptures that were appropriated by the Roman community to serve as a physical repository for public postings, ranging from prayers, to poems, to political manifestos. Robinson takes the spirit of this aggregation of classical art, agitprop, and crude graffiti and applies it to his latest body of work. Robinson gathered 1,000 of his rough, exploratory sketches and compiled them into a series of prints. These adapted drawings fluctuate stylistically and thematically. While some of the subjects are delicately rendered with thin, clean narrow lines, and retain a sense of naturalism, others are bold, sketchy, and extremely gestural, sometimes imparting only the bare essence of what the drawing is representing. The wildly varying styles of draughtsmanship lend themselves well to the dizzying spectrum of subjects that Robinson depicts in his artwork. Nude figures, foodstuffs, modernist furniture, household items, fashion, masks, public figures, and tyrants of the past and present are deftly combined, creating a free association based bricolage that maintains a cohesive yet uneasy cultural narrative. At times, he combines short phrases written in a wide array of fonts, jumbled together. By juxtaposing the lettering against the printed sketches, the text is broken down into its essential elements, revealing just the lines themselves, but still retaining a hint of their original meaning. While mostly monochromatic, color is sometimes introduced in abstracted swaths and layered on in a manner similar to newspaper halftone printing. This serves to further highlight the more formalistic components of the line-work while heightening the hectic nature of the compositions. Through his emphasis on expressive lines and clashing thematic and formalistic rendering, Robinson captures the riotous zeitgeist of popular and political unrest and distills disparate components into an unwieldy and simultaneously succinct form.

While Robinson uses the rough, bare-boned nature of line-work to evoke the wider atmosphere of the contemporary epoch, Rota’s body of work is more particular. Rota turns his focus to precise moments and instances of contemporary political upheavals, injustices, and catastrophes. Often taking inspiration from the constant deluge of news in the digital age, he refines the cacophony of information into unique, pinpointed narrative scenes while embodying the bigger picture. Recently, Rota’s focus has turned to the ever-increasing cataclysmic ecological and human toll resulting from global warming. He composes scenes mimicking the vantage point of satellite images, allowing the audience to survey the crafted locations from an almost omnipotent, god-like perspective. Rota’s drawings are presented in stark black and white, making the detailed, vivid line-work all the more present and visible. Settings of blasted, scorched earth, weather-battered abandoned buildings, increasingly crowded and shrinking enclaves of human inhabitation, and encroaching ominous expanses of water are all meticulously executed. Strokes of ink are bundled and cross-hatched to create thick, dramatic shadows and claustrophobic spaces, or sparingly utilized in small, yet highly kinetic tufts to impart crushing, expanding vastness and dread. This alternation between heavy, granular detail and scarce, negative spaces serves to heighten the weighty ambience of anxiety about the precarious current state of the world. These painstakingly intricate depictions signify a relatable, human story full of pathos, while being a dire warning about the scope and gravity of environmental trauma. 

Robinson and Rota use the concise essence of drawing and linework to convey larger messages about the complicated, unstable, and politically restless present. The lines’ versatility and uncanny ability to relay scale, feeling, tension, and information in a elegantly candid way causes both artists’ works to have a clear intellectual and emotional impact on their audience. 

Hard-Line will be on view at Equity Gallery from March 21st to April 13th, 2019. 

About the Artists

Andrew Cornell Robinson (b. 1968 Camden, NJ) is a contemporary artist who creates sculptural assemblages comprised of ceramic and mixed media juxtaposed with expressive prints and paintings that coalesce in works alluding to myth, ritual and memory. He studied ceramic sculpture at the Glasgow School of Art, Scotland, and the Maryland Institute College of Art where he received a BFA. He was awarded an MFA from the School of Visual Arts, where he became interested with the intersection of memory, identity, politics and power. He has been featured in many publications including Sculpture and Maake magazines, Huffington Post, Hyperallergic, Gay City News, Art Info, etc. His work was featured in “Correspondence between NYC & P-au-P,” a publication about the dialogue between artists from Haiti and New York City. He has participated in curatorial and research projects and was a participating artist in Debtfair a project in the Whitney Biennial. Robinson received an Edward F. Albee fellowship residency. He was a visiting artist with Urban Zen, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti and a resident artist at the Agastya Foundation, in Bangalore, India. He is also the recipient of an Urban Glass Merit Scholarship. He is a member of the faculty at Parsons School of Design, and Greenwich House Pottery. Robinson lives and works in New York City. 

Matt Rota is an illustrator, educator and author. He studied fine arts at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and illustration at the School of Visual Arts. His clients include The New York Times, Der Spiegel, Politico, Foreign Policy, The Washington Post, The New Republic, The Marshall Project, ProPublica, The Columbia Journalism Review, The Center for Investigative Journalism, Zeit, and The Guardian, amongst others. He is an instructor at The School of Visual Arts, and the Maryland Institute, College of Art. His drawings and prints have been exhibited internationally. He is the author of two books on drawing from Rockport Press, The Art of Ballpoint, and Pencil Arts Workshop. 

Press Release: A Congregation of Wits, Drawings and Ideas

Art collector Holly Hager in conversation with visual artist Andrew Cornell Robinson Please join us for refreshments and hors d'oeuvres on Thursday at 7pm for an artist talk when the founder of Curatious, Holly Hager joins artist Andrew Cornell Robinson in conversation about Andrew’s limited-edition print collection “A Congregation of Wits,” on preview at Rusk.

Thursday, 7-9pm, 21 February 2019

Rusk, 39 West 37th Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10018 www.ruskrenovations.com

Seating is limited, please rsvp to Eve Rusk at erusk@ruskinc.com

During a visit to Pasquino, one of the “talking statues” in Rome, Italy, Robinson was moved by the leaflets, poems, prayers, manifestos, affirmations and protestations plastered over this sculpture and pediment. Mementos like these have been left by Romans since the sixteenth century when it was one of the only ways that the disempowered citizenry voiced their complaints against a corrupt city state. Much like the bleating crowds on social media today, these physical traces of the unheard and unheeded create a compelling visual palimpsest of civic gathering. In the limited-edition print, “A Congregation of Wits,” Robinson recalls focusing on the hand-written messages, taped and tacked together. He began exploring through one thousand drawing and transcribing an equal number of quotes, poems, prayers and affirmations; associating a fragment of text to each drawing, imagining the visual aggregation of all these voices. This idea manifested in a series of limited-edition silkscreen prints, monotypes, and related artifacts. These prints with layered meanings, and cryptic drawings of people, places, and things are paired with uncanny phrases composed in bold sans serif and serif letterforms inspired by French and Swiss early modernist typography. The series presents a humorous visual and verbal caricature of conversation.

Holly Hager is an author, art collector, and founder of Curatious, a platform for accessible and interactive education about contemporary art. She did her doctoral work in history and was a faculty member at Fordham University. www.curatious.com

Andrew Cornell Robinson is an artist based in New York City. He received an MFA from the School of Visual Arts and he studied ceramics at the Glasgow School of Art and the Maryland Institute Collage of Art where he received a BFA. While he primarily works in ceramic, he uses an array of materials that include printmaking, drawing, and painting. Robinson is a member of the faculty at Greenwich House Pottery and Parsons School of Design. www.andrewcornellrobinson.com

A Congregation of Wits, a Box of 1,000 PrintsA preview into a collection of 1,000 prints, based on drawings culled from sketchbooks compiled over the course of thirty years of daily drawing. Visual artist Andrew Cornell Robinson has created an on going series exploring image and language.

Initially inspired by a visit to the Talking Sculptures of Rome, which for the past five hundred years, Romans have written poems, prayers, and political protestations and pasted them on a group of ancient sculptures in the eternal city. Much like the public exchange of ideas that take place today upon social media platforms and street art, he has created a collection of silkscreen prints comprised of 1,000 drawings with corresponding text messages printed on the back of each image. Here is a box set of some of these prints.

He is currently working on a series of installations of these prints and a corresponding group of ceramic sculptures, reflecting upon these drawings.

Limited editions from this series are available online at https://tictail.com/acrstudio